Just a short ferry ride from Athens is the island of Aegina, famous for its pistachios, ancient temple, and beautiful scenery. I gave myself just half a day to enjoy the highlights of this island, although if you have more time a full day would be more relaxed and give you chances to explore further.

I started by taking the 75 minute slow ferry from Piraeus to Aegina. There were also fasted 40 minute hydrofoils available, but being on a student budget I picked the cheaper option! This ferry arrived at the pretty Port Aegina, on the western edge of the island. I spent an hour wandering around getting the feel of this seaside town, checking out a pretty local church and strolling around the cafes and tourist shops.


I then headed back towards the port, where there are public buses across the island. Since I left it to late afternoon to visit the island, I managed to get the last bus to the famous Temple of Aphaia, located near the eastern edge of the island. This was denifiely the best Greek temple I’ve seen so far, not only because of how well preserved the structure is, but also the stunning scenery.


After spending 20 minutes exploring, unfortunately I had to leave to catch the same last bus as it returned from Agia Marina. I managed to get a good view out the bus window of the other major sight on the island – the Agios Nektaris monastery. Sadly as this was the last bus I was unable to hop off and explore.


After returning back to Aegina Port, I walked up to the Temple of Apollo. This ancient site is mostly all ruins now, with just one lone pillar still standing.


Heading back into town, I strolled along the beach and waterfront – enjoying the sea views and soaking up the relaxed island atmosphere.


Finally, I grabbed a delicious meal of seafood with spaghetti (just €7!) at one of the many seaside restaurants before returning by ferry to Athens.

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